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Because of these perceived defects in the traditional practice, Christian computists began experimenting with systems for determining Easter that would be free of these defects.But these experiments themselves led to controversy, since some Christians held that the customary practice of holding Easter during the Jewish festival of Unleavened Bread should be continued, even if the Jewish computations were in error from the Christian point of view.Computus (Latin for "computation") is a calculation that determines the calendar date of Easter.Because the date is based on a calendar-dependent equinox rather than the astronomical one, there are differences between calculations done according to the Julian calendar and the modern Gregorian calendar.And it was explicitly stated by Peter, bishop of Alexandria that "the men of the present day now celebrate [Passover] before the [spring] equinox...through negligence and error." Another objection to using the Jewish computation may have been that the Jewish calendar was not unified.Jews in one city might have a method for reckoning the Week of Unleavened Bread different from that used by the Jews of another city.Because of the divergence of tables mentioned above it was usual to negotiate a common date when discrepancies arose.It took several centuries before a common method was accepted throughout Christendom.

The last limit arises from the fact that the crucifixion was considered to have happened on the 14th (the eve of the Passover) and the resurrection therefore on the sixteenth.In the Gregorian calendar those dates are as commonly understood.However, in the Orthodox Churches, while those dates are the same, they are reckoned using the Julian calendar; therefore, on the Gregorian calendar as of the 21st century, those dates are 4 April and 8 May.Easter is the most important Christian feast, and the proper date of its celebration has been the subject of controversy as early as the meeting of Anicetus and Polycarp around 154.According to Eusebius' Church History, quoting Polycrates of Ephesus, churches in the Roman Province of Asia "always observed the day when the people put away the leaven", namely Passover, the 14th of the lunar month of Nisan.

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